Dogwood is Hiring!

Our upscale pet boarding and grooming facility is looking to add a pet groomer to our team. You must be able to show proficiency in all types of grooming. Schedule of work hours is flexible and pay is dependent upon education and experience in the field. Resume and professional references as well as a portfolio of prior work is required to be considered for this position. This is a very flexible position with number of hours and days worked negotiated for the right person. Come join us!

Dogwood Pet Grooming Sturgis SD

Stop in with your Resume or EMAIL it to us!

Required experience:

  • Previous Pet Grooming Experience Required: 1 year

 

4th of July Pet Safety

FireworksFor many people, nothing beats lounging in the backyard on the Fourth of July with good friends and family—including the four-legged members of the household. While it may seem like a great idea to reward Rover with scraps from the grill and bring him along to watch fireworks, in reality some festive foods and products can be potentially hazardous to your pets. The ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center offers the following tips:

  • Never leave alcoholic drinks unattended where pets can reach them. Alcoholic beverages have the potential to poison pets. If ingested, the animal could become very intoxicated and weak, severely depressed or could go into a coma. Death from respiratory failure is also a possibility in severe cases.
  • Do not apply any sunscreen or insect repellent product to your pet that is not labeled specifically for use on animals. Ingestion of sunscreen products can result in drooling, vomiting, diarrhea, excessive thirst and lethargy. The misuse of insect repellent that contains DEET can lead to neurological problems.
  • Always keep matches and lighter fluid out of your pets’ reach. Certain types of matches contain chlorates, which could potentially damage blood cells and result in difficulty breathing—or even kidney disease in severe cases. Lighter fluid can be irritating to skin, and if ingested can produce gastrointestinal irritation and central nervous system depression. If lighter fluid is inhaled, aspiration pneumonia and breathing problems could develop.
  • Keep your pets on their normal diet. Any change, even for one meal, can give your pets severe indigestion and diarrhea. This is particularly true for older animals who have more delicate digestive systems and nutritional requirements. And keep in mind that foods such as onions, chocolate, coffee, avocado, grapes & raisins, salt and yeast dough can all be potentially toxic to companion animals.
  • Do not put glow jewelry on your pets, or allow them to play with it. While the luminescent substance contained in these products is not highly toxic, excessive drooling and gastrointestinal irritation could still result from ingestions, and intestinal blockage could occur from swallowing large pieces of the plastic containers.
  • Keep citronella candles, insect coils and oil products out of reach. Ingestions can produce stomach irritation and possibly even central nervous system depression. If inhaled, the oils could cause aspiration pneumonia in pets.
  • Never use fireworks around pets! While exposure to lit fireworks can potentially result in severe burns and/or trauma to the face and paws of curious pets, even unused fireworks can pose a danger. Many types contain potentially toxic substances, including potassium nitrate, arsenic and other heavy metals.
  • Loud, crowded fireworks displays are no fun for pets, so please resist the urge to take them to Independence Day festivities. Instead, keep your little guys safe from the noise in a quiet, sheltered and escape-proof area at home.

Crate Training Tips

dog-crate-coversPreparation

Choosing a Crate

Pet supply stores and online vendors sell wire crates, plastic airline crates and mesh crates. Each style has its own advantages. Wire crates usually collapse for easy storage and portability, and they provide more ventilation than plastic ones. Plastic crates seem especially den-like and might make dogs feel safer and more secure when they’re inside. Mesh crates provide privacy for dogs and are the most portable, but they aren’t very durable. Some dogs chew through them and escape.

Comfy Crate

After choosing which kind of crate to use, it’s important to make the new crate comfortable. Put it in a room where you spend lots of time, but out of the way of foot traffic. Next, put a soft bed or blanket and a toy or two inside. You can even put a shirt you’ve recently worn into the crate so your dog will feel comforted by your scent. (If your dog likes to chew fabric, you can skip this part.) If you purchase a wire crate for your dog, she might like to have a blanket or towel draped over it to create a more “den-like” feel.

Friday Night: Before You Start Training

The most important part of crate training is teaching your dog to associate her crate with things she loves. Try the ideas below to convince your dog that her new crate is the place to be:

The Treat Fairy

Leave the crate door wide open and make sure your dog has access to the room where you’ve set up the crate. Every so often, when she’s not looking, sneakily toss a few treats around and into the crate so she can discover them on her own. Use something that your dog will love, like small pieces of chicken, cheese, hot dog or freeze-dried liver. You can also leave an exciting new toy, a delicious chew bone or a stuffed KONG® toy inside the crate. Periodically leave special treats in your dog’s crate throughout the evening-and continue to do so every day or so for the next few weeks. If your dog sometimes finds surprise goodies in her crate, she’ll start to love it, and she’ll probably go into it often just to see if the “Treat Fairy” has come.

Room Service

When it’s dinnertime for your dog, place her bowl inside the crate and leave the door open. Try putting the bowl in the back of the crate so your dog has to stand inside the crate to eat. If she seems too uncomfortable to go into the crate at first, you can put the bowl just inside the door instead. That way, she only has to put her head in the crate. Over time, as your dog becomes more and more comfortable stepping inside, you can move the bowl all the way to the back of the crate and, eventually, close the crate door while she eats her meals.

Prepare Supplies for Saturday and Sunday

Over the next couple of days, you’ll reward your dog often for going into her crate. It’s a good idea to prepare some treats in advance. Cut some chicken, cheese, hot dogs, soft dog treats or freeze-dried liver into bite-sized pieces and set them aside for later use. You can also stuff two or three KONGs, which you’ll give your dog when you start to increase the length of time she stays in her crate.

Saturday Morning: Let the Crate Fun Begin!

You’re ready to get started. Gather the treats you prepared and take your dog to the crate.

Step One: Follow the Treat

You can do the following exercises sitting on the floor or in a chair right next to the crate.

  • Give a cue to ask your dog to go into the crate, such as “Go to bed.” (Choose whatever cue you like, just be sure you always use the same one.)
  • Show your dog one of the treats and toss it in the crate. After she goes inside to eat it, praise her enthusiastically and feed her another treat while she’s still inside.
  • Say “Okay” to let your dog know she can come out again. You don’t need to reward her when she comes out of the crate. She needs to learn that all good things happen when she’s inside the crate.

Repeat the steps above 10 times. Take a short break (just a few minutes), and then do another set of 10 repetitions. After your second set, end the training session.

Step Two: Earn the Treat

Later on in the morning, collect some treats and bring your dog to the crate for more training. Now that she’s practiced following a treat into the crate, try asking her to go in before rewarding her with the treat.

  • To warm up, do a couple of repetitions just like you did before-throwing the treat into the crate so that your dog follows it. Then you can change the rules a little.
  • Give your cue, “Go to bed,” and point to the crate instead of throwing a treat into it. (When you point, it might help to move your arm like you did when tossing a treat into the crate. The familiar motion can remind your dog what she’s supposed to do.)
  • When your dog goes in, praise her and immediately give her a couple of treats while she’s still in the crate.
  • Say “Okay” and let your dog come out of the crate.

Do 10 repetitions and then take a short break. Repeat the exercise another 10 times-or until your dog seems to know the game and enters and exits readily when you ask her to.

If your dog seems nervous about going into the crate or confused about what she’s supposed to do when you say the cue, go back and practice Step One for a while longer. When your dog confidently rushes into the crate to get her treat, you can try Step Two again.

Saturday Afternoon: Close the Crate Door

Now it’s time to get your dog used to being in the crate with the door closed.

  • To warm up, do a couple of repetitions just like you did before. Say “Go to bed,” point to the crate, reward your dog with a treat when she goes in and then say “Okay” to let her know she can come out.
  • Now you’ll try closing the crate door for just a moment. Give your cue “Go to bed” and point to the crate.
  • When your dog goes in the crate, praise her and immediately give her a treat. Then gently close the crate door. (You don’t have to latch it yet.) Feed your dog two or three treats through the closed crate door and continue to praise her while she’s in the crate.
  • Say “Okay” and open the crate door to let your dog come out. (If your dog seems stressed or panicked with the door briefly closed, break down this exercise into two phases: in the first phase, just close the door halfway, give a treat and release your dog; in the second phase, close the door all the way.)

Do 10 repetitions and then take a break for a minute or two. Then repeat the exercise 10 more times, slowly building up the time your dog stays in the crate with the door closed. As you increase the time, throw in some easy repetitions, too. Start with 1 second, then increase to 5. Try 8 seconds, then go back to 3. Increase to 10 seconds, then 15, then 20, then an easy 5. Continue to generously reward your dog whenever she’s in the crate. After you finish your second set of 10 repetitions, take a half-hour break. Then repeat the exercise again. Over the afternoon, try to build up to having your dog stay in the crate for one minute.

Saturday Evening: Introduction to Alone Time

When your dog is used to hanging out in her crate with the door closed while you sit nearby, you can move on to the next step: leaving her alone for a little while. Repeat the exercise you’ve been practicing, just as it’s described above-but this time, latch the crate door and start to move away from the crate.

  • To warm up, do a couple of repetitions like you did in the afternoon. Sit on the floor or in a chair next to your dog’s crate. Say “Go to bed” and point to the crate. When your dog goes in, close the crate door and reward her with a few treats while she stays in the crate. After about 30 seconds, say “Okay” and open the crate door to let your dog out.
  • Now you’ll close the crate door briefly. Say your cue, “Go to bed,” and point to the crate. When your dog goes in, close and latch the crate door, and then give her a treat.
  • Stand up and give your dog another treat. Take a few steps away from the crate and then return to give your dog a treat.
  • Say “Okay” and open the crate door to let your dog come out.

Repeat the steps above 10 times, each time walking away in a different direction. After a short break, do 10 more repetitions, slowly building up the time your dog stays in the crate while you walk around the room. As you increase the time, throw in some easy repetitions. Start with 10 seconds, then increase to 15. Try 20 seconds, then go back to 10. Increase to 30 seconds, drop to 15, then up to 45, and then an easy 5. Continue to return to the crate and reward your dog every few seconds while she’s inside. In the beginning, be very generous. As your dog becomes more and more comfortable resting in her crate, you can gradually decrease how frequently you treat her.

After you finish your second set of 10 repetitions, take a half-hour break. Then repeat the exercise another 10 times. Start leaving the room for a few seconds at a time, always returning to reward your dog while she’s in the crate. Try to work up to having your dog stay in the crate for one minute while you walk around the room and briefly leave the room.

Sunday Morning: TV Time

This morning, you’ll teach your dog to relax for longer periods in her crate. You’ll need some treats, a new tasty chew bone or a KONG toy stuffed with something wonderful, like a little peanut butter or cream cheese, and something to occupy yourself. Ask your dog to go in her crate. When she does, praise her and give her the chew bone or stuffed KONG. Then close the crate door and settle down to watch TV or read a book in the same room. Keep your dog in her crate for about half an hour. (If she finishes her chew, you can periodically give her a treat or two, as long as she stays quiet.)

When the half hour is up, calmly open the crate and say “Okay,” so that your dog can come out. Take her chew thing away, and don’t reward her with treats when crate time is over. In fact, it’s best if you just ignore your dog for a few minutes. Again, you want her to learn that great things happen while she’s in the crate, not when she comes out. Take a break from training for a while. An hour or two later, you can repeat the exercise.

Canine Complaining

At this point in your training, your dog might start to object to confinement in her crate. If she barks or whines, you have two options:

1.Ignore her entirely. (Get yourself a pair of earplugs if you need to.) She’s trying to get your attention, so don’t reward her barking by giving it to her! Pretend she’s invisible. As soon as she stops vocalizing for a few seconds, you can give her a treat. With repetition, your dog will learn that she gets ignored if she makes noise, but if she’s quiet, you deliver tasty treats.

2.As soon as your dog starts to bark or whine, make some sort of noise to let her know that she’s made a mistake. You can say “Oops!” or “Too bad,” and then immediately leave the room. Don’t come back until your dog has been quiet for at least 5 to 10 seconds. With repetition, your dog will learn that making noise makes you instantly leave but being quiet makes you come back.

It’s important that you respond consistently when your dog makes noise in her crate. It might be frustrating at first, but if you stick to your plan, she’ll learn that it’s in her best interest to rest quietly when crated.

Sunday Afternoon: Alone Time

Before moving on to Sunday afternoon exercises, give your dog a good workout. Take her outside on a brisk walk or jog, play fetch or tug, or give her a chance to play with a dog buddy. Crate training will be easier if she’s tired. After you’ve exercised your dog, repeat the training steps you practiced this morning, but this time, instead of settling down to relax in the same room as your dog, you’ll move around the house.

  • Ask your dog to go in her crate. When she does, hand her a delicious chew bone or a stuffed KONG. Then close the crate door and walk out of the room.
  • Stay out of the room for 10 minutes. After the time’s up, you can return and let your dog out of the crate. (If she hasn’t finished working on her chew thing, take it away after she leaves the crate. She only gets special goodies during crate time.) If your dog makes noise in the crate while you’re gone, don’t return to let her out until she’s been quiet for 5 to 10 seconds.
  • After a short break, repeat the exercise.

This afternoon, continue to repeat the steps above, slowly building up the time your dog stays in her crate. Try to work up to one full hour of alone time.

Sunday Evening: Time to Leave the House

If your dog can quietly rest in her crate for an hour while you move around the house, you’re ready to leave her home alone. Ask your dog to go in her crate and give her something delicious to chew or eat, just like you did before. Then close the crate and, without saying any goodbyes, leave the house for about 10 minutes. When you return, calmly let your dog out of her crate and take away her chew. Resist the urge to celebrate. Your dog will feel most comfortable going into and out of her crate if you act like it’s no big deal.

Repeat the exercise as often as possible before bedtime, with exercise and potty breaks in between training times. Try to build up to leaving your dog in her crate, home alone, for an hour or two.

My Dog Makes Noise in the Crate

Although it might be difficult, resist the urge to yell at your dog if she complains in her crate. She might respond by quieting down-but the attention from you, even though it’s negative attention, might increase her barking and whining instead. Scolding might also upset your dog, and you want to make her time in the crate as stress-free as possible. It’s also crucial to avoid breaking down and releasing your dog from the crate when she’s making noise. Doing this will send her a clear message: If she barks and whines long enough, you’ll eventually let her out! The key is to teach your dog that you won’t let her out of the crate if she’s making noise-but you will reward her with treats or let her out if she stops.

However, if you have a young puppy, she might not be able to sleep through the night without having to eliminate. If your puppy whines in the middle of the night and you think she might need to go out, do let her out of the crate. Then you can take her directly to the place where you’d like her to eliminate and wait. If she doesn’t go within a minute or two, take her back inside and return her to her crate. Don’t let her romp around during the potty break. You don’t want her to learn that if she whines in her crate, you’ll take her out for playtime!

My Dog Is Afraid to Go Into the Crate

Dogs who seem very nervous about going into crates might need preliminary training with crate-like objects. If your dog seems reluctant to step into a crate, you can try teaching her to walk under a suspended tarp or blanket, step between two upright boards or lie down in the bottom half of an airline crate (with the top removed) before trying to coax her into an enclosed crate. When you start training with an airline or wire crate, it might make your dog more comfortable to remove the door or simply leave it ajar. If you have a mesh crate, flip the door up over the roof to keep it open. It can also help to teach your dog Sit, Down, Stay, Step Forward and Step Back. These skills will give you more control when you’re asking your dog to do specific behaviors in and around her crate.

After some preliminary training with less scary crate-like objects, you can try Weekend Crate Training, but instead of spending a day on each step, try going through the plan more slowly. Only progress to the next step when your dog seems completely comfortable.

Repelling and killing ticks is important

tick

May Special

 10% off any Flea and Tick product during the month of May.

 The mouth parts of a tick act like a tiny harpoon, ready to anchor into the dog or cat’s skin. After they are attached and are feeding a number of organisms can enter a dog or cat’s bloodstream. If a tick is repelled or killed, it cannot attach and transmit organisms that may cause disease.

1. When a tick attaches to your dog or cat, it cuts blood vessels under the skin, causing blood to pool.

2. Tick saliva contains an anticoagulent to keep the blood pool from clotting.

Ticks may also carry organisms that can cause:

  • Lyme disease

Lyme disease is caused by the bacteria Borrelia burgdorferi, and may take less than 24 to more than 48 hours from the time the tick feeds to infect the host. Most infected dogs do not develop clinical disease, but if they do signs may include: inappetence (or anorexia), arthritis, fever and swollen lymph nodes. In some cases, this disease can lead to kidney failure.

  • Rocky Mountain spotted fever

Rocky Mountain spotted fever is caused by Rickettsia rickettsii. It can be contracted 4–48 hours after being transmitted.4 Clinical signs include: lethargy, anorexia, fever, vomiting and bleeding disorders.

  • Ehrlichiosis

Generalized transmission time for Ehrlichia bacteria is 4-48 hours. There are several types of ehrlichiosis, but symptoms in dogs can include: fever, depression, lethargy, loss of appetite, weight loss, enlarged lymph nodes and abnormal bleeding, such as nose bleeds.

  • Cytauxzoonosis

This cat-specific disease can kill cats within one week of the first symptoms. Treatment is rarely successful. This disease is transmitted by ticks, which is why repelling and killing ticks is important.

 

Fleas

Fleas can lead to potentially serious health risks:

  • Skin problems

Flea bites can cause flea allergy dermatitis (FAD), an allergic reaction that can lead to constant scratching, severe itching and hair loss.

  • Intestinal parasites

Ingestion of an infected flea can transmit tapeworms, one of the most common intestinal parasites seen by owners.

  • Anemia

May occur with severe flea infestations. Heavy flea infestations can even cause death.

Fleas are not just a “dog problem”

You or your dog can bring fleas home to infest your cat without you realizing it. This, plus any outside exposure can put a cat at risk for fleas.

about Seresto®

Protection against fleas and ticks for eight months now available at Dogwood Lodge Pet Resort & Grooming Salon

With its innovative delivery system, Seresto® offers a breakthrough in flea and tick protection for dogs or cats for eight months.

Features and benefits:

  • For dogs or cats
  • Kills fleas
  • Repels and kills ticks
  • If a tick is repelled or killed, it can’t attach and
    transmit the organisms that may cause disease
  • Non-greasy, odorless, easy-to-use

 

 

how Seresto® works

An effective combination

Inside the unique polymer matrix of Seresto® are two active ingredients:

  • Imidacloprid has been used in products recommended by veterinarians for years to control flea infestations.
  • Flumethrin effectively repels and kills ticks, and kills larvae and nymphs.

Flumethrin works together with imidacloprid to provide dual action against fleas and ticks. No other treatment has this combination of ingredients.

The active ingredients spread from the site of direct contact over the skin surface of the cat or dog.

Sustained release technology

Seresto® works similarly to a monthly topical, but as the active ingredients wear off over time, a new supply is continuously replenished in low concentrations. The active ingredients spread from the site of direct contact over the skin surface.

Bayer’s polymer matrix technology is designed to slowly and continuously release the active ingredients over eight months, a duration that makes it clearly different from other collars.

Seresto® is water resistant

The active ingredients of Seresto® are contained within the Bayer Polymer Matrix, making it water-resistant. Therefore it is unnecessary to remove the collar before the pet is immersed in water. Seresto® remains effective following a shampoo treatment, swimming, or after exposure to rain or sunlight. Under normal conditions, effectiveness lasts for eight months. In order to maintain an 8-month duration, dogs must not be bathed more than once per month. For dogs that swim once a month or more, the control duration is reduced to five months.

Seresto® safety-release
mechanism

Because some pet owners may be concerned that a cat or small dog could get stuck while wearing a collar, Seresto® is designed with a safety release mechanism. In the unlikely event of the cat being trapped, the cat’s own strength is sufficient to widen the collar to allow for quick release.

A hard pull causes the ratchet-release mechanism to allow a widening of the collar.

 

The small dog and cat collars are equipped with a predetermined breaking point. A harder pull triggers the breaking of the collar at this point.

 

If your cat is not used to collars

If the collar feels foreign, the cat especially may scratch at it initially but should adapt in time. Offering a treat or toy after applying Seresto® may be enough of a distraction to end this behavior.

Slight hair loss and mild skin reactions due to the mechanical irritation of the collar may occur at the application site, which usually recover within a week or two without the need for collar removal.

Please ensure collar is applied correctly. See product insert for complete product information and directions for use.

Best Dog Food: The Search

Feeding your dog a high-quality well-balanced food is one of the best things that you, as a pet owner, can do to keep your dog healthy. A good food will keep your dog’s hair coat shiny and sleek. It will strengthen his immune system. It will keep his digestive system in good health. But when it comes to choosing a dog food, the options seem almost endless.

The Association of American Feed Control Officials (AAFCO) has established guidelines for regulators to govern claims a pet food company can make on its label.

 Read Ingredients

Look at the list of ingredients. Keep in mind that ingredients are listed by weight. Ingredients that contain large amounts of moisture (such as beef, poultry, chicken, or fish) are likely to be at the top of the list because of the moisture content. Ingredients further down the list may offer even more key nutrients such as protein but may weigh less because the water has already been removed for a dry pet food.

Look for Adequacy

You’ll also want to check the pet food label for a nutritional adequacy statement. This statement will read something like “This food is complete and balanced for all life stages,” “This food is complete and balanced for adult maintenance” or “This food is complete and balanced for growth and reproduction.”

Do Homework on Your Brand

Information on sourcing and quality control in manufacturing is not required on pet food labels. You may be able to find the information on the company’s website but if not, call their consumer relations department and ask where its ingredients are sourced. Any reputable company with a quality product will be happy to engage with its consumers.

Next, see if the company manufactures in its own facility rather than outsourcing. This provides better control and safer food for your pup!

Dog breath? Get ‘em to the vet to prevent a costly problem

AVMA (American Veterinarian Medical Association)  Press Release...
dog breath(SCHAUMBURG, Illinois) January 21, 2014—Is the worst part of cuddling with your pet its bad breath? This could be a sign of looming dental problems. Preventive veterinary dental care can save you money in the long run. Pet Dental Health Month, sponsored by the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) every February, reminds pet owners that brushing their pet’s teeth is good for both your pet’s health and your budget.
“It’s something you do every morning, part of your daily routine—brush your teeth. While most people take care of their own mouths, they often forget that they also should take care of their pet’s teeth through a regular dental health care regimen,” explains Dr. Clark K. Fobian, president of the AVMA. “One of the most common problems veterinarians see in pets is dental disease, and, unfortunately, these issues can get serious if untreated. I remind pet owners that an untreated dental infection can spread to the heart, kidneys and other organs, and suddenly become life threatening. Practicing good dental hygiene at home, in addition to regular dental cleanings by your veterinarian, is the most efficient and cost-effective way to keep your pets healthy, comfortable and pain-free.”
According to a 2013 analysis conducted by VPI Pet Insurance, the average cost to prevent dental disease in pets is $171.82, but it costs $531.71 to treat dental disease.

Resources and information for Pet Dental Health Month:

 “We brush our teeth each day, and daily oral hygiene is recommended for dogs and cats from the time the permanent teeth erupt,” explains Dr. Jan Bellows, president of the American Veterinary Dental College. “Brushing is the gold standard, and many dogs and some cats will tolerate having their teeth brushed if the introduction to brushing is managed gently and gradually. In addition, several companion animal nutrition companies offer dental diets.  The texture of those foods generates a mechanical cleansing effect on the surface of the tooth as the pet is eating. Dental treats such as chews can also be effective, either mechanically by scraping the tooth surface or by chemically removing excess calcium in saliva that could otherwise be deposited on the teeth as calculus. There are also plaque-retardant products available in the form of a water additive, spray, gel or dentifrice, and products that are used to seal the surface of the teeth to prolong the beneficial effect of professional dental scaling. Talk to your veterinarian for more advice about preventing dental disease in your pets.”
While regular dental checkups are essential to help maintain your pet’s dental health, there are a number of signs that dental disease has already started. If you notice any of the symptoms below, take your pet into your veterinarian immediately:
  • Red swollen gums and brownish teeth.
  • Bad breath—Most pets have breath that is less than fresh, but if it becomes truly repugnant, similar to the smell of a rotten egg, it’s a sign that periodontal disease has already started.
  • Bleeding from the mouth.
  • requent pawing or rubbing at the face and/or mouth.
  • Reluctance to eat hard foods—for example, picking it up and then spitting it out.

Grooming Puppies

Grooming for a puppy is an absolute must! If your pet needs to be groomed professionally, the best time to start is after they have had all their puppy shots. This is typically around 16 weeks of age.

Many people wait until the puppy is over 6 months for their first groom. However, the sooner you familiarize them with being groomed, the happier your puppy will be. We associate the puppy’s first grooming experience with that of a child first dentist appointment. If it scares them, they will fear and dread it the rest of their lives. However, if introduced at a young age and introduced CORRECTLY, it can be both a positive and rewarding experience.  Love and patience are the keys to years of successful grooming. The following are things you should do with your pet if he is 8 weeks old or 8 years old. It’s never too late!


Play with your pet for a few minutes to help him get rid of some of his excess energy. Select a location for grooming. This should be a table with a rubber type (bath mat) for traction. The reason you should use a specific table (or place) is because  your pet will remember this place and know that it is not play time now but “grooming time”.  Customers are so amazed when they see their pup on our grooming table so well behaved! If introduced correctly and consistently, your pet will associate this experience with pleasure and will look forward to this special time between you and him.  
At first, puppy grooming is also a behavior lesson. Conduct frequent short sessions with patience, LOTS of verbal praise and treats.

Touch your new puppy’s feet and rub your fingers between it’s toes a couple times a day. This will make nail clipping easier. I promise, your groomer and your vet and in the long run, your precious pet, will love you for this.  It is a natural instinct for dogs to pull their feet back when being touched. This is a great idea to start when very young. Many pets are perfect for grooming and only stress out during the nail trimming process.  This can be avoided by your taking the time to help train them to enjoy it.  Show your puppy his brush & comb. Let it sniff and play with it a few seconds. Brush it’s coat a few times, then reward your puppy with a small treat and verbal praise.  Do the same with the comb.  Each day increase the number of brush and comb strokes. After the first week, you should be able to do the brushing AND combing in a short period of time.

Play with your puppy’s ears by touching them on the inside & outside. Afterwards, reward him with lots of praise and a small treat. This is important because so many breeds require the hair be plucked from their ears and this is the second least favorite thing to nail trimming for most dogs.


Open your puppy’s mouth and touch its teeth and gums. Dental care should begin as early as possible. You can begin by using a finger brush or puppy toothbrush and a toothpaste made your pet.  We also offer teeth brushing as an ad on service during any groom session. 
With some time and patience, your puppy will learn to enjoy their grooming sessions and will be happier and healthier in the long run!

Name our fish winners

nameourfishThe winner of the name the fish contest with 14 votes is Amanda Whelchel with Gilbert Goldmember and Gessup Goldphish. They won a bag of Nutro Crunchy Treats.  Second place (which will also receive a prize) with 10 votes is Bonnie and Clyde by Ashley Wiedmer.  They can stop by Dogwood any time to claim their prize!

Top 10 Cold Weather Pet Tips

– Taken from Tony La Russa’s Animal Rescue Foundation Website

1) There’s no place like home
The best strategy, of course, is to keep your pets indoors during inclimate weather. If you don’t want to be outside, your pet probably doesn’t want to be, either.
2) Keep close
When you do venture outdoors with your dog, keep them on-leash. Snow can wipe away familiar scents, causing your dog to become lost or disoriented. Unsupervised dogs also run the risk of falling through thin ice near ponds or other frozen bodies of water.
3) Bundle up!
A fur coat isn’t all the protection your pet needs from the cold, especially if she is short-coated, a puppy, or a senior. She might be much more comfortable in some warm winter-wear. Look for coats or sweaters that cover from neck to tail and aren’t restrictive or uncomfortable. And to keep her skin and coat in tip-top shape from the dry winter air, brush her more frequently than usual, and never shave a long-coated dog during the winter.
4) Warm as toast
Wrapping your pet up in an electric blanket all day might sound like a good idea, but leaving an animal unattended with an electric item is a recipe for disaster.
5) Potty problems
When it’s cold out, pets might resist going to the bathroom outside. Work with them to try to keep them comfortable while they do their business – a jacket might help.
6) Check for cat cargo
When the temperature drops, chilly kitties will look for any warm place to curl up. This includes under the hoods of cars where they can be seriously injured or killed when the car starts. A trick to evict stowaways is to bang on the hood of your car loudly a few times before you enter. Any slumbering felines will be frightened by the noise and escape before you start your car.
7) (Don’t) chill out
You should never leave your pet unattended in a car on a cold day. The winter weather turns your car into a rolling refrigerator – great for keeping your groceries chilled, but terrible for keeping your pet safe. If it’s cold outside, leave your animals warm and safe at home.
8) Dry them off
When coming in from a winter walk or play session, dry your pet off thoroughly and take extra care to wipe her legs, paws, and stomach. Pets in snowy climates can pick up salt, antifreeze, or other dangerous chemicals on their pads and lick them off, making them sick. Ice and salt can also cause their pads to crack and bleed, so look them over thoroughly after all outside adventures.

9) Gimme shelter
Pets should not be kept outside during the cold months. However, if you absolutely must leave them outdoors for a limited amount of time, create a shelter for them to retreat to. It should be dry, clean, and well-insulated, and protect them from the wind and elements. And be sure to frequently check their water bowl to be sure they have plenty of fresh (not frozen) H2O.

10) Stay healthy
Animals with fragile immune systems – including kittens, puppies, and senior pets – might be more susceptible to illness during the change of seasons. If you suspect your animal has a cold weather-related illness, take them to see the vet right away.

Stuff Your Turkey, Not Your Dog…

The Thanksgiving Dinner is a wonderful time of coming together with friends and family. It can also be a time when folks can’t resist slipping your dog a little bit of the Thanksgiving Feast from the table or even after dinner while clearing up. There are so many opportunities for your dog to eat something that can make them feel pretty bad or even cause more harm.

Here are some great tips to remember and share with your guests to help keep your dog and cat safe and happy during the upcoming holidays. We’re wishing everyone a happy and safe holiday season!

1. Turkey Skin – On its own, turkey skin can be fatty and hard to digest, but on Thanksgiving it’s particularly bad (just think of the butter, oils and spices rubbed into it). If you must share the turkey with your dog, peel the skin off and cut the meat up into bite-sized pieces. Also, consider choosing the white meat over the dark for your pooch – it’s a little blander and easier to digest.

2. Cooked Bones – Whether your bird is duck, goose or turkey, do not give the bones to your dog. Any dog cartoon features Fido carrying a bone around in his mouth, but the reality is that a cooked bone is often brittle and sharp pieces can get lodged in your dog’s intestine. Bird bones are hollow and break easily.

3. Gravy/Buttery Side Dishes – This one goes hand-in-hand with the turkey skin. Fatty foods and trimmings can cause Pancreatitis in dogs at worst and diarrhea or vomiting at “best.” Try substituting gravy with a little turkey broth if you really want to give your pup a treat.

4. Aluminum Foil and Plastic Wrap – Dispose of these when you’re done with them. There are two risks here: one, your pet will be licking the fatty substances off the wrappings, and two, swallowing these can cause an intestinal obstruction.

5. Chocolate – Not that we think that you would intentionally feed your dog chocolate (which we all know can be toxic to our canine friends), but since candy is often left out on tables for guests during the holidays, it should be watched. Be sure to keep bowls filled with chocolate and other candies out of vision and out of reach of your dog.

6. The Garbage Can – A pet may be tempted to dig around the trash bin and find a good number of the items listed above.

7. The Kitchen – Thanksgiving can be the busiest day of the year for the kitchen and you’ll want to keep your pup out of there. With hot dishes being whisked from one counter to the next, there’s a chance a dog that’s under foot could be burned or cut if something were to shatter. Always watch where your pet is when the oven door is open.

8. Holiday Plants – Sure it’s Thanksgiving, but a good number of people have already decked the halls with holly by this time. Know that holly berries, mistletoe and Cedar Christmas trees are toxic to dogs.

9. Decorations – Glass ornaments and candles are just begging for trouble. Like the chocolate, keep these out of reach.

10. Guests Who Mean Well – Educate your less pet-savvy visitors (and hey, maybe even send them this list). A child may accidentally feed a dog some chocolate and your great aunt might think she’s being nice by sharing her turkey skin.